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The use of technology in the healthcare setting continues to rise. A recent survey conducted by Epocrates found that 86% of clinicians are using their smartphones for professional activities, and 53% of those clinicians are also using tablets. 
The New York Times recently published a great article entitled “Cleaning the Mobile Germ Warehouse” that does a great job of emphasizing all of the grime that builds up on your mobile devices and the germs that come with that. 
With healthcare costs at an all time high for both patients and hospital operations budgets, the price tag associated with staying healthy is often staggering. Patients may typically blame insurance companies and physicians for hefty bills, though clinics and hospitals funnel monies into several different channels that comprise the cost of doing business in healthcare.
One of the most important selling points of a tablet is its battery life - these devices are only valuable as long as they have power. As tablets continue to become more widely utilized in healthcare, key features such as battery life are being evaluated with a more critical eye. 
According to CDC reports, over 700,000 hospital patients acquired an infection as a result of their hospital stay in 2011, resulting in roughly 75,000 deaths. The majority of these Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs) occurred in intensive care units.
In an effort to continually reduce disease transmission in hospital settings, one doctor is asking if we should stop handshakes altogether.

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