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In one of our recent blog articles we posted the question, when is the last time you disinfected your mobile device? The ability for bacteria to linger and multiply on the surfaces of these devices make that a very important question for those working in germ sensitive environments.
Most people enter the hospital hoping to feel better after they leave, but for 1.7 million Americans every year, this simply isn’t the case. Hospital Acquired Infections, also called HAIs or nosocomial infections, are infections that a hospital patient can develop as a result of their hospital stay (Martin & McFerran, 2008). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that roughly 99,000 deaths each year are related to HAIs (Klevens et al., 2007). 
A fomite is an object that has the potential to become contaminated with any type of germ or bacteria. Fomites are key players in the transfer of pathogens from person-to-person. These objects are responsible for the billions of dollars spent treating hospital acquired infections and paying for sick leaves taken by health care workers. In order to lessen these numbers we must understand the source of the infections. 

Clostridium difficile (c. diff) and methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are two of the more common healthcare acquired infections (HAIs) that create problems in hospitals nationwide.

With healthcare costs at an all time high for both patients and hospital operations budgets, the price tag associated with staying healthy is often staggering. Patients may typically blame insurance companies and physicians for hefty bills, though clinics and hospitals funnel monies into several different channels that comprise the cost of doing business in healthcare.
According to CDC reports, over 700,000 hospital patients acquired an infection as a result of their hospital stay in 2011, resulting in roughly 75,000 deaths. The majority of these Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs) occurred in intensive care units.

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